Beautiful code, ugly fonts, and the architecture of diplomacy

In this podcast, we have a story from California-based freelancer Corey Takahashi on a new exhibit in Silicon Valley that traces the history of computers and their languages.  When Corey and I talked about how to approach this story, we decided that language was the key. Computer programming languages are world-famous among computer programmers, but almost completely unknown to the rest of us. I mean, have you heard of Fortran? Have these languages developed the same way as other languages, acquiring grammatical rules, then  breaking them? Is there such a thing as beautiful code, worthy of our gaze in a museum?

Also, new research suggests that hard-to-read typographical fonts may help us remember the ideas they spell out. Jonah Lehrer spoke to the BBC about this. He writes a blog for Wired on neuroscience. Last September he wrote a post about using his kindle. He found the kindle-reading to be incredibly comfortable and easy — maybe too easy.  More recently he noted that new research appears to confim that hunch. It suggests that we are less likely retain information if it is written in a clear, easy-to-read typeface like Clearview:



Maybe we should all switch to a font like Lucinda Blackletter. OK, maybe not on the roads, but in classrooms:

Part 3 of the pod concerns the architectural grammar of the United Nations Security Council. The design layout of the Council’s chamber and adjourning rooms is considered so important that replicas have been constructed during refurbishment.


Our man in New York Alex Gallafent does a fantastic job of turning a tour of the temporary chambers into an audio history of how architecture and design have shaped the history of UN Security Council.

Listen in iTunes or here.


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One response to “Beautiful code, ugly fonts, and the architecture of diplomacy

  1. Pingback: Çirkin yaz, iyi oku | Defne'nin Annesi

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