Tag Archives: Brazil

Eight words and phrases that make most sense at the World Cup

Photo: Cristiano Oliveira via Flickr

Photo: Cristiano Oliveira via Flickr

Like most sports, soccer has its own technical language. It also has its own slang and neologisms. Here are eight of them.

1. A hora da onça beber agua. (“The jaguar drinks water.”)

This Portuguese phrase is a popular colloquialism in Brazil. It means the moment of truth. It’s often used in a soccer context.

2. Handbags

This is much-used by soccer players in Britain. It refers to a mini-fracas among opposing players, as distinct from full-on fisticuffs. It often involves shouting, pushing and possibly forehead-on-forehead contact—but not head-butting. David Beckham has been known to classify such a minor confrontation as “only handbags.”

3. Drogbacité

Named after Ivory Coast veteran star Didier Drogba. In 2006, Drogba intervened in Ivory Coast’s civil war, imploring both sides to lay down their arms and negotiate. The apparent success of his speech led to the expression drogbacité, which means a combination of good timing, speed and grace under pressure. See the video below for the drogbacité dance.

4. Catenaccio (“The chain”)

An ultra-organized, defensive method of playing soccer popularized in Italy in the 1960s. Don’t expect to see the Italians play that way at this World Cup: these days their strength is in attack, not defence.

5. The Beautiful Game

The origin of this phrase to describe soccer may be British. But it was popularized by Brazilian superstar Pele. And it sounds better in Portuguese: o jogo bonito.

6. Moñas (“Ringlets”)

In his book, Soccer in Sun and Shadow, Eduardo Galeano describes how the these elaborate figure-of-eight moves were once loved by crowds in his native Uruguay. During the 1930 World Cup, the the move intimated and confused teams from Europe. One Uruguayan player even reputedly fooled French journalists into believing that the Uruguayans learned to perform moñas by chasing chickens.

7. Life and Death

The best soccer related quote may be one attributed to Bill Shankly, former manager of English club Liverpool. “Football is not a matter of life and death,” he said. “It’s much more important than that.”

8. Soccer? Football?

Don’t get me started. Just read this.


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A Crash Course in Portuguese With Angelique Kidjo and Fado Novato

With the next World Cup and Summer Olympics in Brazil, get ready to hear plenty of Portuguese. Some people are learning it: Beninese singer Angelique Kidjo listens to Portuguese lessons on her iPod. American singer Shay Estes is studying the language so she can sing that mournful Portuguese folk music known as fado. Estes is the singer with Kansas City-based Fado Novato.

My erstwhile soccer-playing pal Eduardo Krauser translated the satirical “Como Foi Criado O Logo Sa Copa?” riff pictured above. His translation goes like this:

HOW WAS THE WORLD CUP LOGO CREATED?

Tourist arrives in Brazil
Delays at the Airport
High prices, exploitation, trickery
Prostitution, drug trafficking, robbery.

Pollution, poverty, corruption and lack of investment in education!!! This is soccer country and the sixth largest economy in the world!!!



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Grammar tips in Brazil, and magic in a second language

Forget their laidback image, Brazilians care deeply about grammar. One city has a long-established grammar hotline staffed by Portuguese language experts. Now the state of Rio de Janeiro is following suit. This may, or may not, be  in response to the many times Brazil’s head of state, President Luiz Inácio da Silva has loused up his lingo. Lula, as he’s better known, has embarrassed and amused Brazilians for years now with all manner of grammatical gaffes. It seems unlikley, though, that will consult the grammar hotline, either as president, or when he retires on January 1, 2011.

Then, an interview with the newly-crowned world record holder in speed-texting. Melissa Thompson speaks with Marco Werman about why she is so fast at thumbing messages — and why her boyfriend is so very slow. The two sentences that she thumbed in record time (25.94 seconds) were : “the razor-toothed piranhas of the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus are the most ferocious freshwater fish in the world. In reality they seldom attack a human”. Test your how your text-writing skills shape up to Melissa Thompson’s here.

After a diversion by way of a Norwegian word (lakenskrekk; literally, bed sheet dread, or fear of insomnia), we consider the art of performing magic. Specifically, performing in a language that’s not your native tongue. For magicians, this can be a huge challenge: so much about magic — the stories, the sell, the suspension of disbelief — is accomplished through language. So if a native English-speaking magician, for example, finds him or herself required to perform his routine in French, it requires far more than just consulting the dictionary for the equivalent of abracadabra or hocus pocus.  We speak with two magicians, native Hebrew speaker Asi Wind and native English speaker Prakash Puru (pictured), both of whom have made the transtition to performing in a second language.

Listen in iTunes or here.

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